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Undergraduate Courses

Applications of modern mathematics to management and decision making including the solution of optimization problems using network theory, methods for optimal scheduling, voting methods, game theory, and related strategies. Applications include planning of postal delivery routes, placement of cable…
Mathematical modeling using graphical, numerical, symbolic, and verbal techniques to describe and explore real-world data and phenomena. The investigation and analysis of applied problems and questions, and of effective communication of quantitative concepts and results. Semester Course Offered:…
Course ID: MATH 1113E. 3 hours.Course Title: Precalculus Course Description: Preparation for calculus, including an intensive study of algebraic, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions and their graphs. Applications include simple maximum/minimum problems, exponential growth and…
Preparation for calculus, including an intensive study of algebraic, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions and their graphs. Applications include simple maximum/minimum problems, exponential growth and decay, and surveying problems. Semester Course Offered: Offered fall, spring and…
Course ID: MATH 2001. 3 hours.Course Title: Geometry for Elementary School TeachersCourse Description: A deep examination of mathematical topics designed for future elementary school teachers. Visualization. Properties of angles, circles, spheres, triangles, and quadrilaterals. Measurement, length…
Course ID: MATH 2002. 3 hours.Course Title: Numbers, Algebra, and Statistics for Elementary School TeachersCourse Description: A deep examination of mathematical topics designed for future elementary school teachers. Numbers, the decimal system, number lines. Fractions. Number theory: factors,…
Course ID: MATH 2003. 3 hours.Course Title: Arithmetic for Elementary School TeachersCourse Description: A deep examination of mathematical topics designed for future elementary school teachers. The meaning of addition, multiplication, and division. Adding, multiplying and dividing whole numbers,…
Topics specifically chosen to meet the needs of the student of economics: the definite integral, functions of several variables, partial derivatives, Lagrange multipliers, and matrices. Duplicate Credit: Not open to students with credit in MATH 2210, MATH 2210L or MATH 2260 or MATH 2310H or MATH…
Introductory differential calculus and its applications. Topics include limits, continuity, differentiability, derivatives of trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic functions, optimization, curve sketching, antiderivatives, differential equations, and applications. Duplicate Credit: Not open to…
Limits, derivatives, differentiation of algebraic and transcendental functions; linear approximation, curve sketching, optimization, indeterminate forms. The integral, Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, areas. Emphasis on science and engineering applications. Duplicate Credit: Not open to students…
Volumes, arclength, work, separable differential equations. Techniques of integration. Sequences and series, convergence tests, power series and Taylor series. Vectors in three-dimensional space, dot product, cross product, lines and planes. Duplicate Credit: Not open to students with credit in…
Calculus of functions of two and three variables: Parametric curves and applications to planetary motion. Derivatives, the gradient, Lagrange multipliers. Multiple integration, area, volume, and physical applications, polar, cylindrical, and spherical coordinates. Line and surface integrals, Green'…
Course Description: Honors differential calculus and applications, including optimization and related rate problems, L'Hôpital's rule. Introduction to the integral, area between curves, antidifferentiation, and the fundamental theorem of calculus.   Grading System: A-F (Traditional)
Course Description: A more rigorous and extensive treatment of differential calculus. Topics include the real numbers, the least upper bound property, limits, continuity, differentiability, and applications. Students with a strong background and interest in mathematics are encouraged to take this…
Course Description: A rigorous and extensive treatment of differential calculus. Topics include the real numbers, the least upper bound property, limits, continuity, differentiability, and applications. Grading System: A-F (Traditional)
Course Description: A more rigorous and extensive treatment of integral calculus. Topics include the Fundamental Theorem of calculus, applications of integration, logarithms and exponentials, Taylor polynomials, sequences, series, and uniform convergence. Grading System: A-F (Traditional)
Course Description: A rigorous and extensive treatment of integral calculus. Topics include the Fundamental Theorem of calculus, applications of integration, logarithms and exponentials, Taylor polynomials, `sequences, series, and uniform convergence. Grading System: A-F (Traditional)
Calculus of functions of two and three variables: Parametric curves, derivatives, gradient, Lagrange multipliers. Multiple integration, area, volume, polar, cylindrical, and spherical coordinates. Line integrals and Green's Theorem. Introduction to surface integrals and Stokes's and Divergence…
Course ID: CSCI(MATH) 2610. 4 hours.Course Title: Discrete Mathematics for Computer Science Course Description: The fundamental mathematical tools used in computer science: sets, relations, and functions; propositional logic, predicate logic, and inductive proofs; summations, recurrences, and…
Course ID: MATH 2700. 3 hours.Course Title: Elementary Differential Equations Course Description: First and second order ordinary differential equations, including physical and biological applications, numerical solutions, and mathematical modeling. Oasis Title: ELEM DIFF EQNSPrerequisite: MATH…
Course ID: MATH 3000. 3 hours. Course Title: Introduction to Linear Algebra Course Description: Theory and applications of systems of linear equations, vector spaces, and linear transformations. Fundamental concepts include: linear independence, basis, and dimension; orthogonality, projections, and…
        Course ID: MATH 3100H. 3 hours.Course Title: Sequences and Series (Honors)Course Description: Induction, functions, limits, and convergence of sequences and series. Discussions of proof techniques. Definitions of continuity, Intermediate and Maximum Value Theorems. Taylor's Theorem and…
        Course ID: MATH 3100. 3 hours.Course Title: Sequences and SeriesCourse Description: Precise definitions of limit and convergence concepts; practical tests for convergence of infinite series; power series representations and numerical error estimates; applications to calculus and explicit…
Course ID: MATH 3200. 3 hours.Course Title: Introduction to Higher MathematicsCourse Description: Preparation in mathematical reasoning and proof-writing necessary for upper division course work in mathematics. Topics include logic, integers and induction, sets and relations, equivalence relations…
Course Description: Strategies and tactics for solving advanced problems in undergraduate mathematics. Methods will be demonstrated through examples and exercises. (Will not count towards the mathematics degree.) Grading System: S/U (Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory)
Course Description: Linear algebra from an applied and computational viewpoint. Linear equations, vector spaces, linear transformations; linear independence, basis, dimension; orthogonality, projections, and least squares solutions; eigenvalues, eigenvectors, singular value decomposition.…
Vector algebra and geometry, fundamental concepts of linear algebra, linear transformations, differential calculus of functions of several variables, solutions of linear systems and linear independence, extremum problems and projections. This course and its sequel give an integrated and more proof-…
Course Description: Vector algebra and geometry, fundamental concepts of linear algebra, linear transformations, differential calculus of functions of several variables, solutions of linear systems and linear independence, extremum problems and projections. This course and its sequel give an…
Inverse function theorem and manifolds, integration in several variables, the change of variables theorem. Differential forms, line integrals, surface integrals, and Stokes's Theorem; applications to physics. Eigenvalues, eigenvectors, spectral theorem, and applications.
Inverse function theorem and manifolds, integration in several variables, the change of variables theorem. Differential forms, line integrals, surface integrals, and Stokes's Theorem; applications to physics. Eigenvalues, eigenvectors, spectral theorem, and applications.
Abstract algebra, emphasizing geometric motivation and applications. Beginning with a careful study of integers, modular arithmetic, and the Euclidean algorithm, the course moves on to fields, isometries of the complex plane, polynomials, splitting fields, rings, homomorphisms, field extensions,…
More advanced abstract algebraic structures and concepts, such as groups, symmetry, group actions, counting principles, symmetry groups of the regular polyhedra, Burnside's Theorem, isometries of R^3, Galois Theory, and affine and projective geometry.
Orthogonal and unitary groups, spectral theorem; infinite dimensional vector spaces; Jordan and rational canonical forms and applications.
Linear algebra, groups, rings, and modules, intermediate in level between Modern Algebra and Geometry II and Algebra. Topics include the finite-dimensional spectral theorem, group actions, classification of finitely generated modules over principal ideal domains, and canonical forms of linear…
Metric spaces and continuity; differentiable and integrable functions of one variable; sequences and series of functions.
The Lebesgue integral with applications to Fourier analysis and probability.
The derivative as a linear map, inverse and implicit function theorems, change of variables in multiple integrals; manifolds, differential forms, and the generalized Stokes' Theorem.
Differential and integral calculus of functions of a complex variable, with applications. Topics include the Cauchy integral formula, power series and Laurent series, and the residue theorem.
Topological spaces, continuity; connectedness, compactness; separation axioms and Tietze extension theorem; function spaces.
Manifolds in Euclidean space: fundamental ideas of transversality, homotopy, and intersection theory; differential forms, Stokes' Theorem, deRham cohomology, and degree theory.
The geometry of curves and surfaces in Euclidean space: Frenet formulas for curves, notions of curvature for surfaces; Gauss-Bonnet Theorem; discussion of non-Euclidean geometries.
Polynomials and resultants, projective spaces. The focus is on plane algebraic curves: intersection, Bezout's theorem, linear systems, rational curves, singularities, blowing up. Not offered on a regular basis.
Euler's theorem, public key cryptology, pseudoprimes, multiplicative functions, primitive roots, quadratic reciprocity, continued fractions, sums of two squares and Gaussian integers. Not offered on a regular basis.
Recognizing prime numbers, factoring composite numbers, finite fields, elliptic curves, discrete logarithms, private key cryptology, key exchange systems, signature authentication, public key cryptology.
Methods for finding approximate numerical solutions to a variety of mathematical problems, featuring careful error analysis. A mathematical software package will be used to implement iterative techniques for nonlinear equations, polynomial interpolation, integration, and problems in linear algebra…
Numerical solutions of ordinary and partial differential equations, higher-dimensional Newton's method, and splines.
Discrete and continuous random variables, expectation, independence and conditional probability; binomial, Bernoulli, normal, and Poisson distributions; law of large numbers and central limit theorem.
Basic counting principles: permutations, combinations, probability, occupancy problems, and binomial coefficients. More sophisticated methods include generating functions, recurrence relations, inclusion/exclusion principle, and the pigeonhole principle. Additional topics include asymptotic…
Basic counting principles: permutations, combinations, probability, occupancy problems, and binomial coefficients. More sophisticated methods include generating functions, recurrence relations, inclusion/exclusion principle, and the pigeonhole principle. Additional topics include asymptotic…
Elementary theory of graphs and digraphs. Topics include connectivity, reconstruction, trees, Euler's problem, hamiltonicity, network flows, planarity, node and edge colorings, tournaments, matchings, and extremal graphs. A number of algorithms and applications are included.
Elementary theory of graphs and digraphs. Topics include connectivity, reconstruction, trees, Euler's problem, hamiltonicity, network flows, planarity, node and edge colorings, tournaments, matchings, and extremal graphs. A number of algorithms and applications are included.
Transform methods, linear and nonlinear systems of ordinary differential equations, stability, and chaos.
The basic partial differential equations of mathematical physics: Laplace's equation, the wave equation, and the heat equation. Separation of variables and Fourier series techniques are featured.
Basic mathematical models describing the physical, chemical, and biological interactions that affect climate. Mathematical and computational tools for analyzing these models.
Basic mathematical models describing the physical, chemical, and biological interactions that affect climate. Mathematical and computational tools for analyzing these models.
Foundations in the most commonly used transforms in mathematics, science, and engineering. Eigenvector decompositions, Fourier transforms, singular value decompositions, and the Radon transform, with emphasis on mathematical structure and applications.
This course is intended for undergraduates (math majors, music majors, and others) interested in the mathematical aspects of music. At least some familiarity with musical notation is a prerequisite. Topics to be discussed include the structure of sound, the construction of scales, and synthesis.…
Mathematical models in the biological sciences, systems, phase-plane analysis, diffusion, convective transport, bifurcation analysis. Possible applications will include population models, infectious disease and epidemic models, acquired immunity and drug distribution, tumor growth, and analysis of…
Mathematical models in the biological sciences, systems, phase-plane analysis, diffusion, convective transport, bifurcation analysis. Possible applications will include population models, infectious disease and epidemic models, acquired immunity and drug distribution, tumor growth, and analysis of…
Bonds, stock markets, derivatives, arbitrage, and binomial tree models for stocks and options, Black-Scholes formula for options pricing, hedging. Computational methods will be incorporated.
The development of mathematical thought from ancient times to the present, paying particular attention to the context of today's mathematics curriculum. Not offered on a regular basis.
A special topic not otherwise offered in the mathematics curriculum. Not offered on a regular basis.
Research in mathematics directed by a faculty member in the department of mathematics. A final report is required. 1-3 credit hours. Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit. 2-6 hours lab per week. Nontraditional Format: Students will meet with faculty members on a regular basis.
Individual study, reading, projects, or research under the direction of a project director. Not offered on a regular basis.
Individual study, reading, projects, or research under the direction of a project director. Not offered on a regular basis.
Individual research in the major or in a closely related field. Nontraditional Format: Thesis course.
Topics in mathematics designed for future elementary school teachers. Problem solving. Number systems: whole numbers, integers, rational numbers (fractions) and real numbers (decimals), and the relationships between these systems. Understanding multiplication and division, including why standard…
A deep examination of mathematical topics designed for future elementary school teachers. Length, area, and volume. Geometric shapes and their properties. Probability. Elementary number theory. Applications of elementary mathematics.
A deep examination of topics in mathematics that are relevant for elementary school teaching. Probability, number theory, algebra and functions, including ratio and proportion. Posing and modifying problems.
Operations of arithmetic for middle school teachers; number systems; set theory to study mappings, functions, and equivalence relations.
Principles of geometry and measurement for middle school teachers.
Advanced elementary geometry for prospective teachers of secondary school mathematics: axiom systems and models; the parallel postulate; neutral, Euclidean, and non-Euclidean geometries.
Further development of the axioms and models for Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometry; transformation geometry. Often includes advanced topics in geometry.
Topics in mathematics designed for future elementary school teachers. Problem solving. Number systems: whole numbers, integers, rational numbers (fractions) and real numbers (decimals), and the relationships between these systems. Understanding multiplication and division, including why standard…
A deep examination of mathematical topics designed for future elementary school teachers. Length, area, and volume. Geometric shapes and their properties. Probability. Elementary number theory. Applications of elementary mathematics.
A deep examination of topics in mathematics that are relevant for elementary school teaching. Probability, number theory, algebra and functions, including ratio and proportion. Posing and modifying problems.
Operations of arithmetic for middle school teachers; number systems; set theory to study mappings, functions, and equivalence relations.
Principles of geometry and measurement for middle school teachers.
Advanced elementary geometry for prospective teachers of secondary school mathematics: axiom systems and models; the parallel postulate; neutral, Euclidean, and non-Euclidean geometries.
Further development of the axioms and models for Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometry; transformation geometry. Often includes advanced topics in geometry.

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